Recovery is Posssible, Don’t Give Up

Chronic illness, mental illness, an illness which endures is indescribable. It’s made up of pain which cannot be fully understood without actually experiencing it. People with illnesses and injuries, people like myself, aren’t placated into inaction. It’s not as if we don’t strive for the same things you do. It’s not as if we don’t want to excel. It’s that, to no fault of our own, one day we were thrust into a world inept to meet our challenges. This world wasn’t designed for us. The dreams we once had are dashed when we are told what we won’t ever be able to do again.

After my diagnosis of Schizophrenia, it was a death sentence. I’d never do anything worthwhile for the rest of my life. Called ‘profoundly disabled’. It was suggested that I live in a group home until I might end up in the hospital for a long-term stay. But almost four years later I’ve bought my own house and work part-time. I’m a student about to embark on a four-year program to a masters degree. I’m a published author and advocate for other people with psychotic disorders.

I’ve come so much further than any doctor would’ve dare predict. I am not afraid and in fact, I feel powerful. Like I have power over myself and a mind which doesn’t have my best interest at heart. Battles waged against ourselves are often the scariest. And certainly, they are the most difficult. But, when we face ourselves we experience a transformative journey. One which spurs us onward to wellness. That journey wasn’t easy for me and at times I lost myself. Those closest to me, those who were with me at my worst, know that at times I came close to losing the light. But I’m here now and ready to help those who find themselves on the edge like I once did. People with Schizophrenia are told there is no recovery. But I beg to differ. Hard work, harder work than you’ve ever done before, determination, and support dictates your own journey. Everybody’s recovery may look different in the end. But what’s most important is that you didn’t give up. Even when your symptoms were at their worst. And that you pushed yourself as hard as you possibly could.

The message here isn’t just, “don’t give up!” It’s, “recovery is possible, don’t lose hope.”

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A Plan For Daily Self-Care

Daily Carry(with chronic illness)

It’s Okay

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TOPIC: BREATHING EXERCISES

Lessons from DBT: Wise Mind and Mindfullness.

I’ve done two solid years of DBT, the acronym of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. And thanks to the groundbreaking work of Marsha M. Linehan, I’m here today. I can say, with utter truth, that DBT played a huge and integral part in my recovery, and has really shaped me into the person I am today. DBT took me from a place of impulsivity to one frequent peace with myself and my emotions. It wasn’t until after DBT that I began to apply a great deal of importance to inner peace. I want to share these things with people who may also benefit from them. With that said this is Lessons from DBT: Wise Mind and Mindfulness. 

Wise Mind is this beautiful intersection between Rational Mind and Emotional Mind. These two mind states can wreak havoc on your life in you exist too extremely in on or the other. For example, finding yourself only existing in Rational Mind, you might be cold, withdrawn, and lacking empathy. You could be slow to act and struggle to make decisions. While existing only in Emotional Mind you could find yourself acting emotionally impulsive. Jumping to conclusions and letting your emotions dictate your actions. You can see how an unbalanced life could quickly spiral out of control.

This is where Wise Mind comes in. Offering a way to draw from both mind states while not relying on one or the other too fiercely. When I started DBT I was trapped in Emotional Mind nearly all of the time. Acting on one impulsion and then another. Following my psychotic delusions to their end. And, ultimately, putting myself in danger.

I think Marsha Linehan put Wise Mind best when she says, “Wise Mind is like having a heart, everyone has one, whether they experience it or not.” I found, when learning about Wise Mind and becoming acquainted with it, it was best to start with breathing exercises. If you can imagine Wise Mind at the bottom of your stomach you can almost feel Wise Mind growing inside of you as you breathe. Sort of like the calm after the storm.

Try to recognize when your mind state is tipped in one direction or another. I great way to do this is practicing writing down what you are feeling when you are upset, feeling anxious, in crisis, or in my case, experiencing hallucinations. This way, once you have recognized your mind state Rational Mind or Emotional Mind, you will be able to take a step back and begin practicing breathing exercises. Imagining Wise Mind growing inside of your body and bringing with it a calm.

Try the 5-7-5 pattern (it’s a personal favorite). Which is inhaling on the 5, exhaling on the 7, and inhaling again on the 5. This exercise should be repeated for as long as you need it for and until you find yourself in a better place and you can think more clearly.

 

Skeleton Bones, Poorly Oiled

The only thing that wakes me is a cold wind intruding on the warm, late night air of my hospital room. The change in temperature is noticeable, like oil in water. A bright light from the hall. A nurse, curly haired and round, pokes her head in, makes a note on a clipboard, and then vanishes behind a closed door again.

Fifteen-minute wellness checks grow tedious.

I shut my eyes against the darkness and roll onto my other side. Windows look out onto a dusty parking lot. Empty of the many cars the daylight would bring. In the morning the hospital would be full of doctors and nurses. People would go and come. But I would remain for, at least, a week. That’s what my doctor had told me, at least a week.

Tomorrow would bring art therapy group and CBT. I’d meet with a doctor. Be given medications. And work with a caseworker about a discharge plan. When I’d be leaving, where I’d be going, what my new medication regime would look like.

I sighed opening and closing my eyes again. I didn’t want to stay for another week. The monotony of the place ironically maddening. I threw my arm over my eyes, the crook of my elbow settling across my forehead. I bit at my lips. And then, as I finally felt sleep close by, another column of light slunk into my room and the same nurse looked in.

“Please!” I groaned, “Leave me alone!”

“Just doing my job dear.”

Darkness again.

In the hall, I heard two nurses in an exchange. A midnight but ultimately momentary admittance would arrive. They were not to remove his restraints. I thought back to my own admittance. Cowering beneath a tan Egyptian cotton blanket. Arms restrained to the stretcher which I was brought in on. Legs left free and pulled inward.

I begged for sleep, the nurses chattering on outside my door. The Zolpidem which they had given me to help me sleep had since worn off.

“I guess this guy is gonna be committed, we just have to hold him for the night.”

With my eyes shut I wrinkled my brow. Committed…?

“He killed his parents,” and I felt my mouth run dry, “said something about them being the devil’s work.”

I rolled back over, away from the door.

“Found him covered in his parent’s blood.”

A third voice now, “All the people that come through here are fucking psychos. If you ask me they should all be committed.”

My pulse, already high, threatened to break my ribs. I felt a hot bed of tears beginning to form at the edge of my eyes. I wasn’t in the right place to hear any of this. I was the youngest crazy kid on the adult psychiatric ward. Confused, distraught, suicidal, irrational, and impulsive. I thought, in that moment, that maybe I was destined to become the guy who would murder my parents. Maybe some day I’d show up covered in the blood of someone I loved. Maybe it was only a matter of time before I went crazy enough. In a silent rage, I brought the pillow from above my head over my face and screamed into. Emptying my lungs and then my throat, leaving my respiratory tract scratched and raw. I couldn’t have known I had five more of these hospitalizations ahead of me. That I’d almost die. That I was Schizoaffective. I couldn’t have known all the sad music views I’d see from my hospital windows, all the sad music scenes I’d see, all the sad music medicine I’d take before I found the one that worked…

Just as I went in for a second scream there was a commotion in the hall. The sound of a stretcher, a sound I’d never forget, rattling down the hall. Its thin wheels sounded like skeleton bones, poorly oiled, on the clean hospital lelonium. Click, click, squeak.

My next fifteen-minute wellness check came just as the stretcher made it’s way past my door. And in the hall, I saw a man pass by. His hands, though tightly bound, were clean hands. Pale Maine hands.  His face empty, eyes empty. A lost look plastered to him like a missing person’s ad. And as the entire stretcher passed my door I didn’t see a single drop of blood.